Since When Did Ben & Jerrys Create Scrum?

” I must be doing a different flavour of Scrum to you” said the candidate.

“Yeah, see the way we did Scrum we spoke about the Solution in the Story & we did stand ups just twice a week”.

Wow.

Welcome to Face palm city.

Let’s just try to ignore the tiny winy little part about going against the heart of Scrum which is to dis-empower developers,  treat ’em like code monkeys, remove all opportunity to nspire initiative & force-feed developers the solution.

That part didn’t really annoy me …that much 🙂

The part that really got my goat?

The use of the word ‘flavour’ placed confidently next to the word ‘Scrum’.

Dude.

Bro.

Mate.

That’s like placing the word ‘academic’ next to the word ‘Kardashian’.

It not only doesn’t makes sense, but it’s offensive.

But more to the point.

Since when did Ben & Jerry’s begin making icecream in the flavour of Scrum?

Am I missing something here?

Last time I checked the guys who made Scrum was Sutherland & Schwaber – not Ben & bloody Jerry.

But maybe I’ve got this wrong.

Maybe there is a new age of empirical ice cream development in multiple flavours.

Or maybe people started to make things up as they go along without questioning the information they are getting from their sources who claim to be doing a ‘different flavour of Scrum’.

Who ever you are, please read and repeat the following mantra after me:

There are no flavours of Scrum.

There is no chocolate flavoured Scrum.

There is no Caramel chew chew flavour of Scrum.

Scrum is not an ice cream.

It does not come in bloody flavours.

If you want to pick an Agile framework, methodology, technique, or approach which comes in different flavours : go for one which is less prescriptive than Scrum.

That is completely fine.

Kanban for one example (There are only 2 principles, it leaves almost everything open. The only rules are you need to visualize your workflow and limit your WIP).

But Scrum does have rules.

9 Rules in fact.

If you do not follow these 9 rules then you are not doing a different ‘flavour’ of Scrum – you are simply NOT doing Scrum.

Tell me you are helping a company adopt Scrum, tell me you are going towards ‘doing’ Scrum – but again, I repeat if you do not adhere to the 9 rules which ARE prescribed by Scrum, then you are not doing Scrum!

You don’t do the stand up?

You don’t deliver in a timebox?

Ok – understood.

But that means you have not stuck to the principles which make Scrum what Scrum is – and so that my friends, AGAIN – is NOT Scrum.

Rant over.

Now where’s my ice-cream!

3 thoughts on “Since When Did Ben & Jerrys Create Scrum?

  1. Nice post – I smiled throughout.

    But don’t you worry that as agilists we want to embrace change while at the same time saying these particular principles/practices are eternal? Many changes from a good method like Scrum are bad. But does that imply every conceivable change will be bad in every circumstance?

    By the way I think there are 3 (rather than 2 or 4) principles of Kanban (bit.ly/1adoVH4) and none of them mention WIP. The key one you’re missing is “agree to pursue evolutionary change” which implies you’ll try some changes that don’t work and don’t get amplified. But also if some changes work you’ll amplify them even if they break the previous policy you were applying.

  2. Pingback: Scrum ist kein Eis - Lean und Agile

  3. “But don’t you worry that as agilists we want to embrace change while at the same time saying these particular principles/practices are eternal? Many changes from a good method like Scrum are bad. But does that imply every conceivable change will be bad in every circumstance?”

    Thing is Andy, I’m all for embracing change but when we’ve picked a certain framework such as Scrum it is not useful to go against the rules of Scrum because that is what makes it fall down. Maybe mature Agile practitioners can use a less prescriptive methodology or framework to continually embrace change in the way that they work – and of course that change attitude is available in Scrum. Just, less. For example, I see some new Scrum teams wanting to embrace change and they tweak things here and there which negotiate the events that allow the inspect & adapt philosophy to work in Scrum. The end result is that something hasnt been caughty early on, because the Scrum framework got ‘tweaked’. Scrum works when it’s followed – and thats because it allows less room for decisions based on convenience (lets miss todays scrum for one) and bad decisions because a lack of expertise (“forget the kaizen this time round, we already have plenty to do”)

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